Letter to the Editor

Dated 11/14/10


Regarding your quote from Christine O’Donnell on page 3, here is what the actual Constitution states:

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Notice it does not say “separation of church and state,” but rather that the state has no right to make a law regarding any religion, interfering with the free speech and practice of those in the religion – well it is pretty self-explanatory isn’t it, so I don’t know why I’m trying to spell it out for you.

In other words, Christine has every right to speak her beliefs, whether or not we agree with them. And it turns out she was right anyway, at least about this particular statement in the Constitution.

Oh and as for her comments on evolution and whatnot…well she’s right about that too! You see, it’s called the Evolutionary THEORY for a reason. I will reference dictionary.com for this: A theory is “a proposed explanation whose status is still conjectural, in contrast to well-established propositions that are regarded as reporting matters of actual fact.”

So though evolution may not be a complete “myth” as she purportedly claimed, Christine is right in the sense that it has not been PROVEN true. I personally believe in God and my faith is very important to me, and I ALSO believe evolution to be true for the most part. But once again there is no way we can ever fully prove that’s how humans came to exist. That’s just what I believe. You may believe something different, and that’s great. Congratulations.

But can you imagine if you stated your beliefs and all of a sudden everyone began to mock you in public and make a complete joke out of you, just for saying what you believe? You’d be pretty pissed right? Because after all, don’t we have freedom of speech? And it shouldn’t matter what you believe in since Congress can’t make any law prohibiting your beliefs, right? I mean, that is what the Constitution says, isn’t it? Well I would ask Christine O’Donnell about that if I were you.

Andrea Brunetto
Junior Graphic Design Major

Comments

One Comment so far. Leave a comment below.
  1. Glenn,

    Andrea,

    Please read the following two articles I’ve written about the issue of freedom of speech:

    http://tcnjperspective.com/2010/11/06/recent-first-amendment-controversies/

    http://tcnjperspective.com/2010/02/03/tcnj-for-free-speech-support-oppose-or-feel-apathetic-towards-tucker-max/

    You misrepresent what “free speech” means. It does not mean that you can say things and not get criticized for them. If somebody wants to run for public office, they can expect that their statements to be scrutinized. That is the very basis of the electoral process.

    I don’t understand how you can simultaneously say “Oh and as for her comments on evolution and whatnot…well she’s right about that too!”, while admitting “So though evolution may not be a complete ‘myth’ as she purportedly claimed”.

    Your argument boils down to the following:

    If a theory is referred to as a “myth” by a candidate for public office, not only is that person “right” because if something has not been proven, it must be false, if that person is criticized for that statement, they are having their civil liberties infringed upon.

    You, like Christine O’Donnell, seem to misunderstand the very basics of Constitutional law.

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